Old Masters Academy

Posts Tagged "Classical painting techniques"

The Painting Techniques of the Venetian School Masters

The Painting Techniques of the Venetian School Masters

Venetian Painting Technique The Venetian painting technique was developed from many prior classical painting techniques, and is in effect a culmination of the methods that came before it. The approach to Venetian painting outlined below is a modified version that builds on the Renaissance method, incorporating modern chemicals and a contemporary palette. Venetian painting methods rose to prominence in the 17th century, and were used by painters like Titian, Caravaggio, and Velazquez. The most widespread use of these techniques was witnessed during the Baroque period, and they are ideal for still life painting, portraiture, and compositions that use strong, single-source lighting. The Technique– 1. The first step to creating this type of painting is a basic underdrawing which records the…

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Press Release: Brand-New Fine Art Video Lessons Resource Finally Available Online

  Fine Art Video Lessons Finally Available Online A brand-new video course about classical oil painting and drawing techniques has been launched by the Web Art Academy. The Academy (http://art.webartacademy.com) offers fine art video lessons that reveal, step-by-step, the full process of artwork creation. Art students can now learn by watching the fine artist in action.   London UK. A brand-new website offering high-quality fine art instruction has just been launched. The Web Art Academy (http://art.webartacademy.com) reveals traditional oil painting and drawing techniques to fine art students through the use of high-definition video lessons. The Web Art Academy was created to give fine art students a thorough instruction in the almost lost secrets of traditional oil painting and drawing. Natalie…

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Classical painting techniques in Renaissance. Foreshortening

Classical painting techniques in Renaissance. Foreshortening

Classical painting techniques in Renaissance – Foreshortening Part 4 Foreshortening refers to the visual effect or optical illusion that an object or distance appears shorter than it actually is because it is angled toward the viewer. Although foreshortening is an important element in art where visual perspective is being depicted, foreshortening occurs in other types of two-dimensional representations of three-dimensional scenes. Some other types where foreshortening can occur include oblique parallel projection drawings. Figure F1 shows two different projections of a stack of two cubes, illustrating oblique parallel projection foreshortening (“A”) and perspective foreshortening (“B”). This technique was often used in Renaissance painting.

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Classical painting techniques – Influences

Classical painting techniques – Influences

Classical painting techniques – Renaissance art Part 2 Influences: The influences upon the development of Renaissance art in the early 15th century are those that also affected Philosophy, Literature, Architecture, Theology, Science, Government and other aspects of society. The following list presents a summary, dealt with more fully in the main articles that are cited above. 1. Classical texts, lost to European scholars for centuries, became available. These included Philosophy, Poetry, Drama, Science, a thesis on the Arts and Early Christian Theology. 2. Simultaneously, Europe gained access to advanced mathematics which had its provenance in the works of Islamic scholars. 3. The advent of movable type printing in the 15th century meant that ideas could be disseminated easily, and an…

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Classical painting techniques – Renaissance art

Classical painting techniques. Part 1 Renaissance art is the painting, sculpture and decorative arts of that period of European history known as the Renaissance, emerging as a distinct style in Italy in about 1400, in parallel with developments which occurred in philosophy, literature, music and science. Renaissance art, perceived as a “rebirth” of ancient traditions, took as its foundation the art of Classical antiquity, but transformed that tradition by the absorption of recent developments in the art of Northern Europe and by application of contemporary scientific knowledge. Renaissance art, with Renaissance Humanist philosophy, spread throughout Europe, affecting both artists and their patrons with the development of new techniques and new artistic sensibilities. Renaissance art marks the transition of Europe from…

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